domenica, Febbraio 25, 2024

INTELLIGENZA ARTIFICIALE NELLO SPAZIO

PASSAGGI

  • International Space Station Launches AI Program to Test Astronaut Gloves, April 4. By Brandi Vincent, Nextgov. NASA, Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Microsoft developed and tested an artificial intelligence workload in-orbit aboard the International Space Station. Offering the promise of boosting astronauts’ safety when conducting ISS-aligned missions, that test is one part of a package of announcements Microsoft unveiled on Monday detailing capabilities aimed at driving developers to make and deploy new space applications and workloads. (read more)
  • è stato lanciato, ad Ankara, lo U.S.-Turkey Strategic Mechanism (United States Department of State
  • Partnership tra USA e Lettonia nell’ambito del programma Foundational Infrastructure for Responsible Use of Small Modular Reactor Technology (FIRST) (United States Department of State)
  • Carnegie Middle East Center riflette sull’importanza del confine turco-siriano: “The Turkish-Syrian border is divided into separate areas of control—under the Syrian Democratic Forces in northeast Syria, Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham in Idlib, and Turkey in several cantons—which sustain contradictory political projects. Yet these border areas constitute a single political-security ecosystem, one connected to southern Turkey and regime-held Syria. As such, only a peace agreement that treats the border areas as an indivisible whole and delimits the major powers’ zones of influence can lead to a stable long-term arrangement”.
  • il lento parlare di pace nello Yemen (AGSIW)

(di Marco Emanuele)

AROUND THE WORLD

Europe

  • How the EU Can Unlock the Private Sector’s Human-Mobility Data for Social Good, March 28. By , Center for Data Innovation. Many businesses routinely collect data about the location of consumers, such as where they are when they make a purchase or use a mobile app. Aggregating this information reveals useful insights about human mobility and social interaction. Researchers, governments, and others can use this mobility data, while respecting user privacy, to study and address many pressing societal challenges, such as disease spread, urban functioning, forced migration, climate change, and disaster response. To support these types of applications, EU policymakers should encourage businesses to share mobility data by implementing policies that provide firms with regulatory clarity, financial incentives, and technical resources to give out this type of data. (read more)

Turkey – Syria

  • Border Nation: The Reshaping of the Syrian-Turkish Borderlands, March 30. By Armenak Tokmajyan, Kheder Khaddour, Carnegie Middle East Center. The Turkish-Syrian border is divided into separate areas of control—under the Syrian Democratic Forces in northeast Syria, Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham in Idlib, and Turkey in several cantons—which sustain contradictory political projects. Yet these border areas constitute a single political-security ecosystem, one connected to southern Turkey and regime-held Syria. As such, only a peace agreement that treats the border areas as an indivisible whole and delimits the major powers’ zones of influence can lead to a stable long-term arrangement. (read more)

USA

  • Congress Should Take This Big Step Towards Energy Efficiency, April 4. By Joy Ditto, Nextgov. In his March State of the Union address, President Joe Biden reaffirmed his commitment to cutting energy costs for families and combating climate change. The president correctly noted that changes to the U.S. tax code can be a valuable tool for achieving both goals. (Nextgov)
  • Login.gov plans to scale up without facial recognition tech – for now, April 4. By Natalie Alms, Nextgov. The General Services Administration intends to drastically scale the use of the government’s secure sign-on service, Login.gov, in coming years, according to new agency budget documents and performance goals. And although the authentication and identity verification system doesn’t currently use facial recognition, budget documents say that Login.gov is still “exploring … how to address potential discrimination with facial recognition.”. (read more)
  • The New Federal IT Dashboard Falls Short of Its Aims, March 30. By Eric Egan, ITIF. Earlier this month, the General Services Administration (GSA) launched a redesigned Federal IT Dashboard, a website that aims to enable “agencies, [Office of Management and Budget] OMB, Congress, [Government Accountability Office] GAO, and the public to understand the value of their federal IT portfolios, manage the health of their IT investments, and make better IT planning decisions.”. (read more)
  • U.S. Should Stop Delaying Deployment of Autonomous Track Inspection, April 4. By Daniel Castro, ITIF. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) recently denied a U.S. freight railroad permission to use autonomous track inspection technology, a loss for those promoting greater use of automation to enhance rail safety and lower costs in the supply chain. Unfortunately, railroads face steep barriers to deploying the latest technologies as they must comply with outdated regulations and attempts to modernize these rules incur significant pushback from organized labor. If FRA will not expedite greater use of autonomous track inspection technology, Congress should step in.  (read more)
  • Podcast: Investing in American Dynamism, With Ben Horowitz and Katherine Boyle, April 4. By Robert D. Atkinson  Jackie Whisman, ITIF. Venture capitalists know what it feels like when a company is firing on all cylinders. But it’s been a while since the whole country had that feeling of dynamism—so why not focus on companies that help the cause by supporting the national interest, solving critical problems, and doing fundamentally new things? Rob and Jackie sat down with Ben Horowitz and Katherine Boyle of the leading VC firm Andreessen Horowitz to talk about investing in American dynamism. (read more)

USA – Latvia

USA – Turkey

World Government Summit – Dubai

Yemen

DEFENSE – MILITARY – SPACE – CYBER SECURITY

  • Top Marine Defends Corps’ Lighter Direction. April 5. By Caitlin M. Kenney, Bradley Peniston, Defense One. The Marine Corps commandant pushed back against criticisms of his drive toward a lighter Corps, arguing that the reshaped force would better dissuade China from aggression in the Pacific region. (read more)
  • Army eyes thousands of IVAS systems with FY23 budget, April 4. By Colin Demarest, Defense News. The U.S. Army in fiscal year 2023 is seeking hundreds of millions of dollars for its Integrated Visual Augmentation System, a do-it-all headset that has faced challenges in the field and in the halls of Congress. Some $400 million is marked for procurement, Director of Force Development Brig. Gen. Michael McCurry told reporters March 29, enough for “just over 7,000 IVAS systems for” three brigade combat teams, pending successful testing. The sum is about half of a prior request. (read more)

ON LIFE

  • Your Data Isn’t Gold; It’s Not Even Yours, April 1. By David Moschella, ITIF. We hear it so often that it’s easy to assume it must be true. “Our data is gold, and we should be compensated for it.” These two statements basically tell consumers that they are being taken advantage of, even ripped off by Big Tech. Not surprisingly, this has led to resentment and calls for action. But there is just one problem: Both assertions are much more wrong than right. Today’s leading technology companies are extraordinarily profitable, but this is far more due to the unique features of information economics than any data ownership or usage abuses. (read more)

RUSSIA – UKRAINE (reactions, impact, consequences)

  • Europeans weigh scope of security guarantees for Ukraine, April 4. European governments are expected to discuss their part in security guarantees that could be promised to Ukraine under a potential peace deal following Russia’s increasingly brutal attack on the country, according to a senior European Union official. The comments come as talks between Ukrainian and Russian negotiators last week teed up the question of alternative assurances — outside of NATO’s Article 5 mutual-assistance clause — the West is willing to underwrite after Moscow stops its assault. (read more)

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